Taylor Swift Reminds Swifties to Register to Vote: ‘I’ve Heard You Raise Your Voices, and I Know How Powerful They Are’

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Taylor Swift wants to know — are Swifites registered to vote yet? 

Swift took to her Instagram — where she boasts more than 272 million followers — on National Voter Registration Day this Tuesday to share a message to her fans urging them to register to vote. She also shared a link to Vote.org, a non-profit voting registration platform and organization which she has previously partnered with.

“I’ve been so lucky to see so many of you guys at my U.S. shows recently,” her statement starts. “I’ve heard you raise your voices, and I know how powerful they are. Make sure you’re ready to use them in our elections this year!”

She continued, “Today, on National Voter Registration Day, it’s vital that young voters, in particular, understand they have the power to shape their future,” said Andrea Hailey, CEO of Vote.org. “Eight million young people will be newly eligible voters by Election Day 2024. And, the time is now to get ready for the elections taking place this fall and next year. Several states have elections in November of this year and many other states will have primaries in the first few months of 2024. That’s why this National Voter Registration Day is so important: we’re at the starting line of the next presidential election.”

Swift’s loyal fanbase has backed her time and time again, whether that be through Spotify streams or album sales. She’s the first female artist to breach 100 million monthly Spotify listeners, a feat boosted by her latest re-released of “Speak Now: Taylor’s Version” which debuted at No. 1. 

Swifties are currently gearing up to experience her “Eras Tour” concert film that earned a whopping $26 million in presale tickets at AMC Theatres, breaking the previously held record of single-day ticket sales that was held by “Spider-Man: No Way Home” ($16.9 million).

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