‘NYPD Blue’ star David Caruso seen in rare photo since leaving spotlight

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‘NYPD Blue’ star David Caruso seen in rare photo since leaving spotlight

David Caruso has been seen in public after leaving acting more than 10 years ago.

Caruso appeared on popular police dramas like “NYPD Blue” and “CSI: Miami,” but after the latter went off the air in 2012, he stopped acting. Now, Caruso has been photographed while out and about in Miami.

In the photos, he is wearing a casual blue zip-up sweatshirt, and his famous red hair has grown long.

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David Caruso, pictured on the set of “NYPD Blue” (left) and in a recent photo taken in Miami. (Getty Images/Coleman-Rayner)

Caruso’s first credited acting role was in the 1980 movie “Getting Wasted.” Throughout the ’80s he continued to act, seemingly showing a preference for roles on crime shows. He had character arcs on “Crime Story,” “H.E.L.P.” and “Hill Street Blues.”

In 1993, Caruso landed a lead role as Detective John Kelly on a new show, “NYPD Blue.” He saw massive success, but according to Rolling Stone, he made the decision to leave just a few episodes into the second season after the network refused to give him a sizable raise. Instead of continuing on with the series, which ran for a total of 12 seasons, he tried his hand at becoming a movie star.

split of David Caruso then and now

David Caruso in 1994 on the set of “NYPD Blue” (left) and recently in Miami. (Getty Images/Coleman-Rayner)

In 1995, he appeared in two movies, “Jade” and “Kiss of Death.” Both were poorly received.

”In all honesty, I just didn’t have the tools,” the actor admitted about leaving “NYPD Blue” in a 2000 interview with The New York Times. ”I didn’t know how to handle the responsibility. I handled it like an amateur. I didn’t realize how upset people were until the show was over. I didn’t get it. And I think it has a lot to do with fear. I mean, I was terrified I couldn’t meet the challenge of the job. The quality level was very high for the show, and I was in a full-blown panic. I didn’t want to lose it after all those years of being told I wasn’t the right guy for the part.”

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He added, ”I was in a dream, you know. It was a fantasy that was terrifying for me because now that my dream was here, I felt it would all go away, I would drop the ball, lose it. And I didn’t realize it was creating tension on the show, affecting other people. And it was about my fear.”

Dennis Franz and David Caruso in

Dennis Franz and David Caruso, who starred on “NYPD Blue.” (ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Content)

After doing a few more movies, Caruso came back to television, playing the title character in 1997’s “Michael Hayes,” a show about a former police officer. It lasted for one season.

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Finally, in 2002, Caruso achieved success once again with “CSI: Miami.” Playing the lead once again as Lieutenant Horatio “H” Caine, he was with the show for 19 years before it was canceled in 2012. The Los Angeles Times reported that the reason behind the cancelation was a decline in ratings along with a sharp rise in production costs.

David Caruso on

David Caruso starred on “CSI: Miami” for 10 seasons. (Ron P. Jaffe/CBS Photo Archive)

Fans were left without a proper send-off to the series, which had been extremely popular. The decision to cancel was announced three months after the last season finished filming, and there was no move to bring the cast and crew back together to tie up any loose ends.

“CSI: Miami” remains the actor’s last credit, 11 years after the series finale aired. In the years since, he’s moved on to the art world. For a time, he owned an art gallery in Los Angeles, though that appears to be closed now.

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Currently, Caruso owns a clothing store in Miami called Steam on Sunset.

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