Iris Apfel, the New York fashion icon, dies at 102

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Iris Apfel, the New York fashion icon, dies at 102

Iris Apfel, an eccentric New York fashion icon, died on Friday at 102. We can read it on her Instagram account, under a photo of her dressed in a long gold patterned dress and large black glasses. His last post was just two days ago, February 29, when he celebrated his “102 and a half years”.

The “geriatric starlet” from Queens, as she liked to call herself, had recently signed a collection for H&M, after multiple collaborations including Citroën, Magnum, Happy Calze and Mac. With 2.9 million followers on Instagram, the centenarian fashionista was still participating in the major fashion events and still showed in his wheelchair.

Born in 1921 to a Jewish family in New York, Iris Apfel studied art history. An interior designer, he participated in the renovations of the White House for nine presidents, from Harry Truman to Bill Clinton. He collected clothes by the greatest designers of the 20th century, which occupied two floors of his luxury Park Avenue apartment and to which the Met in New York dedicated a retrospective in 2005.

“One day someone told me 'you're not pretty and you never will be, but it doesn't matter, you have something much more important: you have style'”, Iris loved to say. In 2016, she was the subject of an exhibition at the Bon Marché in Paris, the face of a Citroën advertising campaign, as well as an Australian ready-to-wear brand, Blue Illusion. In 2015, after 67 years together, she lost her husband Carl, a textile industrialist who died at the age of 100. Passionate about colorful outfits, Apfel invited women to abandon “the uniform of black tights or jeans with a sweater, ankle boots and leather jacket”, so much so that her mantra was “dare to be different!”.

Reproduction reserved © Copyright ANSA

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