Favino to students, 'your voice is worth it'

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Favino to students, 'your voice is worth it'

“Let me just tell you to be careful to always make your voice heard. Your voice is valuable, precisely because it is yours, however you decide to make it heard, with art, politics, work. Your opinion is yours and it can be different from that of your neighbour”: this is what Pierfrancesco Favino said to high school students at The Space Moderno Cinema in Rome.
The actor invited the kids not to passively live reality. The meeting, moderated by the critic Fabio Ferzetti, and the screening of Nostalgia by Mario Martone, are part of the Cinema, History & Society programme, included within the ABC School Projects, which accompanies high school students in Rome and Lazio discovering the seventh art.
The actor answered questions from the boys and girls for over an hour, telling backstage anecdotes, the ideas and stimuli he collected to build his character. Martone's film perfectly captures the essence of a neighborhood in great turmoil, Sanità, which thanks to the education of the new generations and culture is able to be reborn. The initiatives of Don Luigi (played by Francesco Di Leva and inspired by the real Don Antonio Loffredo) offer young people living on the streets the possibility of freeing themselves from a future marked by crime and marginalization. Nostalgia is not just a film, but an invitation to rediscover one's roots for the definition of a new self, it is a manifesto of emancipation for boys and girls, offering them hope for a better future. While working in healthcare, he saw first-hand the importance of providing an alternative to youth situations even in the most difficult contexts, to propose a new mentality, as Francesco Di Leva does, who uses theater to reconvert potential criminal realities.

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