A new Roman complex discovered at Villa dei Misteri after the demolition of illegal houses

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A new Roman complex discovered at Villa dei Misteri after the demolition of illegal houses
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An ancient complex from the Roman era found after the demolition of two illegal houses in Villa dei Misteri, in the Archaeological Park of Pompeii. “It is a wall with a breach from which you enter a cryptoporticus”, as explained today in a press conference by Gabriel Zuchtriegel , director of the Park, explaining that everything was possible thanks to the collaboration of the Public Prosecutor's Office at the Torre court Annunziata. What re-emerges is a perimeter wall and a probably servile neighborhood of the Villa dei Misteri, which until now remained officially unexplored, although there are traces of the passage of grave robbers who, over the years, have infested various archaeological sites.

A small country road was also rediscovered which could be a branch of the road to ancient Herculaneum, the so-called via superior . “This is a unique opportunity to shed light on the unexplored part of Villa dei Misteri”, Zuchtriegel further explained, “and also understand the damage caused by clandestine excavations, given that we found many traces of tunnels and tunnels”. Work that will also continue at the Civita Giuliana site , where a two-storey building was found with “a well-preserved roof, a decorated room, ceiling and holes on all sides”. Here too, however, the misfortune of the grave robbers who “excavated on multiple levels, systematically looting the rooms”, underlined Zuchtriegel again.

Slowly, therefore, we are trying to bring to light as much of the ancient Roman Pompeii as possible, and above all of the Villa dei Misteri, the large villa which at the time of the eruption in 79 AD was under restoration due to the damage caused by the earthquake of 62 , and whose owner is unknown, most likely a rich Roman senator. To date, in fact, only its custodian is known: Lucio Istacidio Zosimo , a freedman (perhaps of Greek origin) of the noble Pompeian family of the Istacidi, who is said to have purchased the villa at a particularly advantageous price just after the damage of the earthquake, for then begin the repairs which, due to the eruption of 79 AD, were never completed.

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